Currently browsing the "Michelle Pfeiffer" tag.

Review: French Exit

If this film does one good thing, it’s that it reminds us what a wonderful screen presence Michelle Pfeiffer is. She stars as Frances, a New York socialite who, following her husband’s death, somehow spends all the money left to her and in her social embarrassment, runs away to Paris where a friend has offered her an apartment she isn’t using. (Why don’t I have a friend like that?) She takes along her son Malcolm (Lucas Hedges), snatching him out of school and away from his girlfriend and they board an ocean liner where he meets and beds Madeleine (Danielle Macdonald, Dumplin’), a fortune teller. Frances also takes her cat Little Frank (perhaps a reincarnation of the dead husband Frank) along, sneaking him aboard. Once they get to Paris and the small apartment (small by a rich New Yorker’s standards, that is) they meet a series of quirky people and have a series of peculiar encounters. The movie has a Woody Allen meets Wes Anderson vibe, though it doesn’t rise to either of their levels. It’s one of those flicks without much of a plot that depends on you wanting to spend some time with its characters. I’m not sure I did.

Review: mother!

This is without doubt the most divisive movie to come out in a long time. People either hate it or love it, with very few people on the fence about it. I make it a point not to read reviews before I go to see a film I’m planning to cover, but the headlines screaming about mother! (not to be confused with one of my favorite Korean films called Mother sans exclamation point) couldn’t be ignored. It got an F from viewer-polled Cinemascore, but earned raves from some well-known critics. The New York Times even posted an article titled, “Hating ‘Mother!’: Readers Speak Out.” And after finally seeing it for myself, I understand both sides of the argument, but come down on the WTF#?! side.

The Family

The Family is fine, but ultimately fuhgeddable. Robert De Niro plays Fred Manzoni, a mafia boss with a price on his head for ratting out his friends. Fred and his quirky family – including wife Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer) and teenage kids Belle (Dianna Agron) and Warren (John D’Leo) are placed in the Witness Protection Program – but keeping them out of trouble is no easy task. Old habits die hard and all.

People Like Us

People Like Us will have to fight for attention and word of mouth. But it’s a very satisfying departure from the loud, crazy, crude, animated, 3D, superhero, star-studded or simply bizarre flicks that tend to dominate the summer box office. It’s a nice adult-themed PG-13 drama/comedy that’s inspired by true events, which makes it all the more intriguing.

Dark Shadows

I remember all too well running home from school to catch Jonathan Frid as Barnabas Collins in the original vampire soap Dark Shadows. All my girl friends and I had a thing for him, the Edward or Jacob (or Lestat or Angel or Bill…) of our era. That he was not really handsome in any sense is beside the point. There was something very attractive, dare I say sexy, about that immortal blood sucker. So having Johnny Depp (who I’d pay to watch reading a phone book) play Barnabas in this new Tim Burton version should make it even better, right?

Chéri

I heard about Chéri when it was around, but being in small town USA, it was only here for an instant and I missed it. Fortunately, it is now on DVD and it is a great chick flick, especially for women over 35. 50+ and still ravishing, Michelle Pfeiffer is lovely playing Léa, a courtesan of a certain age in Belle Époque Paris. Rupert Friend (Albert in The Young Victoria) plays Chéri, the 19-year-old son of one of Léa’s old courtesan rivals (Kathy Bates). He has known and loved Léa since childhood, and when his mother needs someone to talk to him about his directionless life, she calls Léa.