Currently browsing the "Paul Rudd" tag.

Review: Ant-Man and the Wasp

As a sequel to a lightweight Marvel movie, Ant-Man and the Wasp does its job. It’s entertaining and finds a way to work in the necessary connections to the Avengers franchise and the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe. If you skipped the first Ant-Man, or expect to see Ant-Man courting a White Anglo-Saxon Protestant, or couldn’t care less about the Avengers, then move along. This movie isn’t for you. If, however, you enjoyed the first Ant-Man flick, wonder why Ant-Man was a no-show in Infinity War, or simply like Paul Rudd (I mean, really, who doesn’t like Paul Rudd?), then take no shame in embracing the family-friendly buzz around Ant-Man and the Wasp. It is summer, after all.

Captain America: Civil War

I’ve always considered myself an Iron Man gal in the Avengers universe, but man oh man, Captain America is growing on me! So while I understand the marketing appeal of a #TeamCap v. #TeamIronMan rivalry, I am hereby declaring myself Switzerland in this Civil War! I refuse to choose. And as any Avengers fan is sure to guess, you don’t really have to. The marketing gimmick – like the movie itself – is all in good fun. That’s not to say there isn’t a decent story at the heart of this latest entry in Marvel’s Avengers franchise. There is. And that’s why this movie deserves to crush DC Comics’ Batman vs. Superman at the box office. It’s full of action, drama, Stark snark, superhero banter, a few unexpected twists, and good old-fashioned themes about friendship, conscience, and moral ambiguity. Can you tell I kinda liked it?

Ant-Man

Ant-Man is Iron Man light. Right down to the teeny tiny suit. And since I’m a huge fan of Iron Man (due mostly to Robert Downey Jr.), I couldn’t help but like Ant-Man. It’s rather weak on the grand scale of Marvel comic superhero movies (i.e. those featuring the various “Avengers” including Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, etc.) but Paul Rudd is still fun to watch as Scott Lang, a smart, sarcastic and kind-hearted master thief looking for redemption.

Admission

This one sneaked past us while it was in the theaters, but it feels like a “stay home with a big bowl of popcorn” kind of movie anyway. It’s basically a pleasant flick in search of a genre. It’s not really a comedy or a romance or a romcom or anything else. It has a good cast, but there is no chemistry between the two leads, Paul Rudd and Tina Fey. And even though the characters are likeable, they are not given a whole lot to do. Perhaps the problem lies with the setting, the Admissions Office at Princeton University, not the first place you think of for hilarity and romance.

This Is 40

Writer/director Judd Apatow’s midlife crisis comedy This is 40 is not that funny, or even that good – especially for a movie that the studio has been touting for major awards consideration. Best Picture? Seriously?! I’m a firm believer in the whole ‘write what you know’ philosophy. But in this case, art imitating life isn’t much fun to watch – even if you’re the target demographic: a happily or unhappily-married 30 or 40-something with kids. If you’re looking for validation or commiseration, you’ll certainly find that here. But if you’re looking for a cinematic escape, pick something else (scroll through our site – there’s lots to choose from!).

Our Idiot Brother

Our Idiot Brother is an okay movie that dabbles in the funny but never quite reaches the level of good drama or good comedy. It feels more like a warped episode of the recently-canceled television drama Brothers & Sisters. So if you’re mourning the loss of that one, then Our Idiot Brother may provide some fleeting solace.

How Do You Know?

How Do You Know a movie just doesn’t work? You look at the people around you as the credits roll and nobody’s saying much of anything – good or bad. The movie is so-so at best. It’s a shame, ‘cause I really wanted to like it. We’re so overdue for a good romantic comedy this holiday season!!! So what happened?

Dinner for Schmucks

If Dinner for Schmucks were actually a dinner, I’d say the first course and the dessert were quite satisfying but the entrée left a lot to be desired. The meal, I mean movie, starts with an amuse-bouche of a scene – someone carefully creating romantic scenes using gussied up dead mice. Turns out the person with the tiny taxidermy hobby is Barry (Steve Carell).  Barry runs into Tim (Paul Rudd) or rather Tim runs into Barry – literally – when Barry darts into the street to retrieve a dead mouse, and then the madness begins.