Currently browsing the "spy drama" tag.

Review: The Courier

This is another “based on true events” film. The story begins in 1960 as Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev is threatening to bury the West. The CIA and MI6 are scrambling for ways to get some inside info on the Soviet nuclear program, and to that end they make the unlikely decision to recruit a British salesman, Greville Wynne (Benedict Cumberbatch). He’s done business for some time in Eastern Europe so heading to Moscow wouldn’t be a red flag to Soviet intelligence. And he’s not expected to do anything except be a courier for leaked intel. Former Soviet military intelligence colonel, now trade minister Oleg Penkovsky (Merab Ninidze) has already made contact. He has unfettered access to all the crucial intelligence, and he’s got a conscience. He may be a believer in the Soviet Socialist system, but he’s willing to work against it to stop the march towards what he sees as inevitable nuclear war. And together Oleg and Grenville save the world. Really.

Quickie Review: Red Joan

There’s no denying Judi Dench’s watchability factor. The Grand Dame of cinema commands the screen whenever she’s on it – which isn’t all that much in the not-so-thrilling spy thriller Red Joan. Don’t let the poster, trailer and top billing fool you. Dench is merely a high-profile vehicle for bookending a story told primarily through flashbacks, with Sophie Cookson (Kingsman: The Secret Service) playing young Joan Stanley, an impressionable and idealistic Brit turned longtime spy for the KGB.

Allied

Allied is a good ol’ fashioned romantic thriller starring Brad Pitt and Academy-Award winning actress Marion Cotillard (La Vie en rose) as Max and Marianne, a Canadian intelligence officer and French resistance fighter who are thrown together for a dangerous, top-secret mission behind enemy lines in 1942 North Africa. They fall in love awfully fast, but it seems real enough. They get married. Start a family. Gaze adoringly into each other’s eyes. Until one day, Max is told that Marion is actually a German spy, and if the proof is substantiated, he must kill her. Ouch.

A Most Wanted Man

There is really just one reason to go see A Most Wanted Man — Philip Seymour Hoffman. The film, while good on its own terms, mainly serves as a reminder of what an immense talent we lost. Hoffman plays a German spy in this John le Carré adaptation from director Anton Corbijn who brought us the equally thoughtful The American. And like his previous film, this one depends on the audience getting inside the protagonist’s skin. I’m not sure it would have worked without Hoffman.

The Tourist

‘Tis the season for dramatic, intense, riveting, must-see Oscar-worthy films. The Tourist isn’t one of them. Sure, it’s kind of fun. And you get to tool around Venice with Johnny Depp. But the movie has a major identity problem. Is it a spy thriller? A drama? A romantic comedy? Sometimes. Sometimes. Sometimes. Is it any good? It’s okay. It’s entertaining enough to kill time, but it’s not a must see. It’s a fine date movie or a viable solution for a diverse group of folks who want to see a movie together but can’t reach consensus on a film/genre.