Currently browsing the "Aaron Taylor-Johnson" tag.

Cinema Clash podcast: Snatched; The Lovers; King Arthur; The Wall; Obit

I missed my chance to see the Amy Schumer/Goldie Hawn Mother’s-Day-weekend comedy Snatched and King Arthur: Legend of the Sword before they opened, but that didn’t stop me from chatting about them with someone who did. So tune in to the Cinema Clash with Charlie and Hannah for lively debate about those two flicks, in addition to the dysfunctional marital drama The Lovers, the psychological war drama The Wall, and the surprisingly entertaining deadline-oriented documentary Obit.

Avengers: Age of Ultron

Fans of the Avengers – assemble! My guess is they’re already packing the midnight showings and putting this superhero superflick in prime position to knock those Fast and Furious folks from the top of the Box Office. And rightly so. Avengers: Age of Ultron delivers the goods. It’s not as good as the first one, but it serves the purpose of advancing the Marvel mythology and providing pure escapist entertainment by bringing together, once again, the world’s mightiest heroes, including Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), The Incredible Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner). Eye candy, sarcasm, action. What’s not to like?

Anna Karenina

If ever there were a Chick Flick shoo in, this should be it. A tragic heroine foolishly throwing off her shackles for a forbidden love, and all wrapped up in really beautiful clothes — not to mention adapted from one of the greatest of all Russian novels. Anna Karenina stars Keira Knightley and is directed by Joe Wright who also made Atonement and Pride and Prejudice with her in the lead. In case you never read the book, the basic story is that Anna is married to a Russian aristocrat and high-ranking civil servant (Jude Law). They have a young son she adores, but a chance meeting with a handsome young army officer, Count Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), changes her very staid life in every way possible. It is love at first sight, and in late nineteenth century Russian society, even rich women had few rights and a long list of rules they were required to live by. Having a very visible affair was definitely not an option.