Currently browsing the "artist" tag.

Review: Ursula von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own

Ursula Von Rydingsvard’s name did not ring a bell when I first heard of this documentary. But after watching it, I realize I’ve actually seen and loved her work in many of the important museums around the world. Ursula von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own makes the case that she should be as well known as many of the other female sculptors of the modern age, like Louise Bourgeois or Louise Nevelson. In this short documentary (it’s just 57 minutes) director Daniel Traub deftly mixes the story of her personal life with the making of her amazing art. She’s one of the few women who make monumental sculptures, and just seeing how it’s done is worth the cost of admission.

Review: Kusama: Infinity

This documentary was full of surprises for me. I’ve been an art lover for as long as I can remember, but somehow missed knowing one of the most critically acclaimed artists of our time. Her name is Yayoi Kusama, and this film about her is eye-opening, even if you’ve seen her work in museums (as I apparently had without remembering her name.) Now in her late 80s and still working, her installations and retrospectives regularly sell out at top museums and galleries around the world. But her journey to acceptance was anything but easy. Hers is a story of overcoming personal trauma by turning it into a life’s work and embracing her unstoppable creative genius. It’s well worth seeing.

Review: Faces Places

Looking for a quirky fun film? How about a film where an 80-something-year-old New Wave film director takes an art filled road trip around France with a famous young muralist? Faces Places is a film like no other. It’s a buddy film, a travelogue, an art documentary, and a brilliant performance art piece. And it’s above all just a whole lot of fun watching this odd couple of the decade, tiny Agnes Varda with her two-tone hair and hip young JR with his penchant for wearing dark glasses 24/7, as they tool around rural France in his photo booth van, connecting with locals and leaving them with fabulous art installations.

Hockney

David Hockney has to be one of the most famous living artists. His work is in every major modern art museum and verging on 80 he is still going strong, having embraced the iPad as a new medium for his vast body of work. This latest documentary about him (there have been several others) takes an exhaustive look at his life and work, but failed to pull me in. And at nearly two hours I think the filmmaker included a lot of footage that could easily have been left out and made a more focused film.

Finding Vivian Maier

A couple of years ago, an unknown but super talented street photographer’s work started showing up in art blogs and around the net. The images shot between the 50s and the 90s were amazing, but the story of the artist was equally compelling. Thousands of negatives and undeveloped rolls of film were found in a storage locker after the photographer died in obscurity and were bought for a few hundred dollars at auction by John Maloof who directed and produced this film. He was smart enough to realize he had something special and began publishing some of the work on the Internet, quickly creating a vast and hungry audience for the images of a previously undiscovered 20th century photography master. Finding Vivian Maier is the story of his journey to find out who this amazingly gifted and prolific photographer was.