Currently browsing the "Susan Sarandon" tag.

Mainstream Chick’s Quick Takes: Keanu; Mother’s Day; The Meddler; Dough; Papa: Hemingway in Cuba; Ratchet and Clank

Keanu: I never saw the television series featuring Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele (aka comedy duo Key & Peele) so I wasn’t familiar with their shtick heading into this flick. But I understand their appeal. Keanu is an absurd but entertaining R-rated action comedy that pokes brilliant fun at the action genre. Here’s the premise: Key and Peele play Clarence and Rell, straight-laced cousins who must impersonate ruthless killers in an effort to retrieve Rell’s adorable kitten, Keanu, after he’s cat-napped by members of the Blips gang (rejects from LA’s notorious Bloods and Crips). The kitten is a scene-stealing feline, and there’s a hilarious homage to George Michael’s ‘80s pop icon status. The movie isn’t for everyone, but Key and Peele fans won’t be disappointed, and the duo will likely gain some new fans as well.

Tammy

Tammy is just okay, which translates into disappointing. I generally like Melissa McCarthy, but her shtick is getting old. I felt like I was watching the same (disappointing) character she played in Identify Thief, only this time she shares a car ride with Susan Sarandon instead of Jason Bateman. Or the same character she played in the more solid comedy The Heat with Sandra Bullock.

The Big Wedding

Ouch. This movie is getting some harsh reviews. So maybe I missed something – or am simply more forgiving – ‘cause I didn’t hate it. I actually thought it was mildly amusing, especially if you’re in the mood for a quirky, formulaic, pseudo-romantic, somewhat raunchy comedy that’s strictly for grown-ups. Sure, it’s not as good as you might expect (or hope), considering the all-star cast. But it’s not as bad as it might have been, thanks to an all-star cast. If you have 90 minutes to kill and want to say “I Do”, here’s the scoop:

Arbitrage

Arbitrage is already out on DVD, so this brief review falls into the ‘better late than never’ category. I actually watched Arbitrage on the heels of Flight and it made for a rather interesting double feature. Both movies star extremely watchable men (Denzel Washington in Flight, Richard Gere in Arbitrage) playing extremely flawed and conflicted characters that you can’t help but root for on some level — even when they’re being total jackasses. You can read more about Flight here. As for Arbitrage, it’s a much quieter drama that never quite gets off the ground.

Robot & Frank

Robot & Frank is a fun little indie comedy that will probably pass most people by. Set in the “near future” it is about an aging man who is clearly not all there any longer, and his son’s solution is to give him a robot that will take care of him. The central character Frank is played by the wonderfully talented Frank Langella (Frost/Nixon) and is no syrupy sweet old doddering fool or even lovable curmudgeon. He is a full ranging character who is right on that edge of knowing that he is losing it. He has some serious gaps in his memory, but what he does remember are the skills he used as a young man when he was a successful second story man, mostly a jewel thief.

Solitary Man

There are some movies that do not add up to the sum of their parts. Solitary Man is one of those films. The acting is great. Michael Douglas, Susan Sarandon, Mary-Louise Parker and especially Danny Devito all do their best. The script has some fine dialogue, and the cinematography is top notch. But it just isn’t a great film.