Currently browsing the "Tina Fey" tag.

This Is Where I Leave You

This Is Where I Leave You starts off strong, then loses its way, despite having an A-List cast with the chops to achieve something far greater. Perhaps it was the script. Or the over-abundance of family dysfunction that seemed to loom larger than the fake boobs proudly (and often) exhibited by Jane Fonda’s matriarch character.

Here’s the gist: When their father passes away, the four grown Altman siblings are forced to return home and live under the same roof for a week with their over-sharing therapist mother (Fonda) who used her kids as fodder for a bunch of best-selling books on family dysfunction. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. The siblings spend the week confronting their past, present and future, with an array of spouses, exes, significant others, kids, friends and foes added to the mix- for occasional comedic and dramatic effect.

Admission

This one sneaked past us while it was in the theaters, but it feels like a “stay home with a big bowl of popcorn” kind of movie anyway. It’s basically a pleasant flick in search of a genre. It’s not really a comedy or a romance or a romcom or anything else. It has a good cast, but there is no chemistry between the two leads, Paul Rudd and Tina Fey. And even though the characters are likeable, they are not given a whole lot to do. Perhaps the problem lies with the setting, the Admissions Office at Princeton University, not the first place you think of for hilarity and romance.

Megamind

Megamind is megafun – for both kids and adults. I took my “seven-year-old excuse to go see animated movies” and both he and I laughed out loud at parts. He was so enthusiastic that before we even left the theater he asked when it was coming out on DVD.

Date Night

If you’re a couple enjoying a rare date night, don’t waste your time (and money) on this movie, unless you’re too tired to care that it’s pretty boring. Date Night will make for a harmless time killer on an airplane or on the small screen soon enough. But as a feature film, it’s really weak, despite the general likeability of its stars, Tina Fey and Steve Carrell.