Currently browsing the "andrew garfield" tag.

Hacksaw Ridge

Hacksaw Ridge is a decent movie that sheds light on a great, little-known story about a war hero who never touched a gun. The film has something for just about everyone — religious convictions for the faith-based crowd, romance for the chick-flick crowd, and (very) intense battlefield scenes for the macho crowd. It’s a hybrid that in many ways feels like a composite of a bunch of war movies we’ve seen before. But it finds its unique sweet spot in the character of Desmond Doss, played by Andrew Garfield (99 Homes, Spider-Man).

99 Homes

99 Homes is one of those indies that could easily slip through the cracks at the box office but deserves some word-of-mouth love – even from a ‘Mainstream Chick’. It’s a compelling, timely, and well-acted drama that will surely hit (too) close to home for anyone who lost their home – or came close– during the housing crisis. The film puts a human face on a national disaster that allowed certain individuals and institutions to profit off the misfortune of others who got in over their heads financially, largely due to the failure of banks and government agencies to provide proper guidance, intervention, or oversight.

The Amazing Spider-Man 2

First things first: Andrew Garfield (Peter Parker/Spidey) and his on-and-off-screen love interest Emma Stone (Gwen Stacy) are disgustingly cute together. And it totally works. In fact, their chemistry is key to this sequel to the 2012 reboot, especially for those who aren’t well-versed or deeply invested in the superhero/supervillain comic universe.

The Amazing Spider-Man

Yes, the story is somewhat different. But it’s also kinda the same. And therein lies the rub. There’s nothing wrong with the Spider-Man reboot – it just doesn’t need to be. The incredibly talented cast is wasted on a retread. I mean, c’mon Hollywood, can’t you find just one solid, original script worth taking a multi-million dollar gamble on?

First, for what’s different: The Amazing Spider-Man focuses on the true origins of the Spidey character, including Peter Parker’s quest to understand why his parents left him in the care of good ol’ Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen) and Aunt May (Sally Field) when he was just a boy.  When Peter (Andrew Garfield) crosses paths with his father’s former partner, Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), you know that can’t end well. Especially when Dr. Connors starts putzing around with a serum that turns him into a giant killer lizard.

The Social Network

When I saw the early blurbs about this movie, I was thinking it would be either a big yawn or a lot of youth culture that would make me feel really old. But The Social Network is neither of those things. It is a really involving, well-made drama based on the story of the creation of Facebook (or as it was originally called, The Facebook.)

Never Let Me Go

Never Let Me Go is another one of those interesting, well-acted and somewhat thought-provoking films that simply fails to float my mainstream boat but is likely to find an appreciative arthouse audience. It’s also really hard to review because to divulge too much of the plot would be unfair to the film and its potential viewers. One’s enjoyment – or investment- in the story hinges on not really knowing what to expect as the drama unfolds (though readers of the novel it’s based on, by Kazuo Ishiguro, will certainly be in the know). Never Let Me Go has all the hallmarks of a traditional indie, yet it’s tinged with a bit of the sci-fi, making it all the more difficult to define and categorize.